Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Second Session – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting the leading case of the second webinar. The PA radiograph belongs to a 62-year-old man with hemoptysis.

Is the radiograph abnormal?
If so, what do you see?

Starting this week, I have decided to stop giving live webinars. They will be recorded and published at the end of the week, together with the answer to the case. You can see the first session here

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows convexity of the aorto-pulmonary window (A, arrow) and an opacity in the upper left hilum (A, red arrow). The findings were not present in a film taken three years earlier (B, circle) and suggest a pulmonary process with mediastinal adenopathy.

Findings were overlooked and the chest was read as normal. Six months later the patient returned with acute right chest pain. PA chest shows two triangular pleural-based opacities (C, arrows) suggestive of Hampton’s humps. The convexity at the APW is larger (C, green arrow) and the hilar opacity has increased in size (C, red arrow).

Coronal CT shows the typical appearance of pulmonary infarcts at the right lung base (D, arrows). There is large adenopathy at the APW (D, green arrow) accompanied by a lung mass (D, red arrow).

Final diagnosis: carcinoma of the lung with mediastinal metastases and associated pulmonary infarcts.
 
Congratulations to S, who made a brilliant diagnosis.
 
Teaching point: Remember the importance of checklists. If a checklist had been used in the initial radiography, a CT would had been taken and the tumor would had been discovered earlier

If you would like to learn more about this subject, check the webinar Prof. Cáceres recorded explaining this cases and others! You can also check the first webinar here.

2 thoughts on “Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Second Session – SOLVED

  1. 1. Two small well-fined nodules noted in the bilateral lower zones.
    2. Prominent left pulmonary bay and left hila
    3.? Boardbased radioopacity in the left paratracheal and left hila region – ? aortic / vertebral origin.

    Like

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