Emergency #20 – Flashcard

14-year-old boy:
– Actue pain left hemiscrotum

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Click here to see the answer

Acute torsion testis

– Less/no vascularisation – flow with color Doppler-affected testicle
– Lower echogenicity or heterogeneous aspect testicle, if too late already hypoechoic infarcts
– Testicle displaced cranially in the scrotum
– Twisted spermatic cord “like a knot”
– Reactive hydrocele

Below you can see images from a companion case:

Cáceres’ Corner Case 226 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today’s radiographs belong to a 27-year-old woman who came for a routine check-up.

Most likely diagnosis:

1. Thymic tumor
2. Enlarged lymph nodes
3. Aortic arch malformation
4. None of the above

CT images will be shown next Wednesday.

Click here to see the first images

Dear Friends,

Today I am showing enhanced CT images of the mediastinum in the early (A-B) and late phases (C-E).
What do you think?

Click here to see more images

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows a right upper mediastinal mass with undulated border (A, arrow). There is increased opacity of the anterior clear space in the lateral view (B, circle). In my opinion, the most likely diagnosis would be thymic tumor, although the undulated border favors enlarged lymph nodes.

Enhanced axial CTs in the arterial phase show an anterior mediastinal mass with minimal enhancement (C-D, arrows) and a vascular space in the center (C, yellow arrow).

Coronal and axial CTs in the late phase show partial washout of the vascular space (E, yellow arrow). The clue to the diagnosis lies in the presence of several punctate calcifications within the mass (F-G, red arrows) consistent with phleboliths, which are practically diagnostic of hemangioma. The central vascular space also supports the diagnosis.

The patient had been diagnosed of mediastinal hemangioma two years earlier and comparison with previous chest films and CTs did not show any change.
 
Final diagnosis: Mediastinal hemangioma
 
Congratulations to Naegleria and MK who gave similar diagnosis both at exactly 12:55 P.M.
 
Teaching point: This case is unusual (I have seen only two of them in the mediastinum) but can be easily diagnosed if phleboliths are present (and recognized). Early in my residency I learned that, when finding phleboliths within a mass, the diagnosis should be hemangioma until proven otherwise.
 
Ref. HP McAdams, ML Rosado de Christenson, CA Moran. Mediastinal hemangioma: radiographic and CT features in 14 patients. Radiology 1994; 193:399-402

Cáceres’ Corner Case 225 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today’s radiographs belong to a 37-year-old man with moderate fever.
What do you think?

Come back on Friday to see the answer!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: Chest radiographs show an intrapulmonary rounded opacity with ill-defined borders in the left lung (A-B, arrows). In a patient with fever and no other significant symptoms, the most likely diagnosis should be rounded pneumonia, although I was somewhat concerned about the good definition of the lower contour in the lateral view (B, red arrows), which is unusual in pneumonia.

The patient improved with treatment and follow-up radiographs four weeks later show only minimal residual findings in the PA view (C, arrow).

Final diagnosis: rounded pneumonia simulating a pulmonary mass.

Congratulations to Ahmad, who was the first to give the correct diagnosis. Silver medal to Sara Mercado/span>, who arrived second three hours later.

Teaching point: remember that not all pulmonary nodules/masses are malignant. If you want to know more about them, look up Diploma #51 “Innocuous pulmonary nodules”

Cáceres’ Corner Case 224 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Due to the coronavirus scare, Dr Pepe and Miss Piggy have eloped to the Bahamas, leaving me alone in charge of the blog. Until his return in late March, I will present interesting cases in the Caceres’ Corner. I may even dare to present a Diploma case, although I am not as knowledgeable as Dr Pepe.

This week’s case is a preoperative PA radiograph of a 47-year-old woman.

Diagnosis:

1. Double aortic arch
2. Enlarged azygos vein
3. Mediastinal mass
4. None of the above

What do you see? Come back on Friday to see the answer!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA shows a right mediastinal bump at the confluence between the trachea and the RUL bronchus (A, arrow). There is a curved mediastinal line below (A, red arrow) and an extra mediastinal line in the left lower mediastinal border (A, yellow arrow).

The combination of these findings strongly suggests increased circulation in the azygos system, with prominent azygos and hemiazygos veins. In an asymptomatic patient the most likely diagnosis is a congenital interruption of the IVC with azygos continuation.
A double aortic arch can be ruled out because the right component raises higher than the left, and in this case the opposite occurs.

Unenhanced coronal CT confirms the dilated azygos arch (B, arrow) and the dilated ascending azygos (B-C, red arrows) and hemiazygos (C, yellow arrow)

Final diagnosis: Congenital interruption of the IVC with azygos continuation.
 
Congratulations to Hazem who was the first to give the correct answer and to Krister who gave a nice and accurate description of the findings.
 
Teaching point: this case is a good example of non-significant findings secondary to a congenital malformation, as mentioned in webinar eight.

Musculoskeletal #9 – Flashcard

12-year-old boy, asymptomatic:

Radiograph a

Radiograph b

What do you see?

Lytic lesion on distal fibular metaphysis with well-defined sclerotic borders is seen on both anteroposterior (a) and oblique (b) radiographs

What do you see?

NOF: non ossifying fibroma

– Most common fibrous bone lesion
– Same as fibrous cortical defect but larger version
– If large enough, may cause pathological fractures
– One of DON’T TOUCH lesions

Cáceres’ Corner Case 223 – SOLVED

Today’s radiographs belong to a 77-year-old man with dyspnea.

Diagnosis:

1.  Allergic aspergillosis
2.  A-V malformations
3.  Chronic changes post-TB
4.  None of the above

What do you see? Come back on Friday to see the answer 🙂

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiographs shows elongated opacities apparently arising from the hila (A, arrows). The lack of branching goes against mucous impactions. The clue to the diagnosis lies in the calcified pleural plaque in the right hemidiaphragm (A, red arrow), which is a sign that strongly suggests asbestos exposure.
This diagnosis is corroborated by the lateral view, which shows calcified pleural plaques in the anterior clear space (B, red arrow).

Previous AP and oblique rib radiographs after chest trauma show the undulated calcified plaque in the right hemithorax (C-D, arrows).

Unenhanced coronal CT confirms the plaque in the right hemidiaphragm (E, arrow). Axial CTs demonstrate the anterior plaques (F-G, red arrows), as well as the unaffected lung (F).

Final diagnosis: calcified pleural plaques simulating pulmonary disease.
 
Congratulations to Phi Pham, who was the first to make the correct diagnosis.
 
Teaching point: Remember that superimposed opacities may simulate intrapulmonary pathology.