Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook 154 – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Eighth Session – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Showing today the leading case of webinar eight. Radiographs belong to 27-year-old with seminoma and pain in the anterior chest wall. What is your opinion about the  clavicular lesion?

1. Metastasis
2. Osteomyelitis
3. Benign bone lesion
4. Any of the above

Check out the last webinar form the series explaining in detail this case on our youtube channel and and catch up on previous ones on the EBR YouTube channel!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: the chest radiograph shows a lytic lesion in the proximal right clavicle (A-B, circles). It has a sclerotic border (A-B, red arrows), indicating a slow-growing process. This finding excludes options 1 and 2 and leaves option 3. Benign bone lesion as the correct diagnosis.

This lytic lesion correspond to a normal variant, called the rhomboid fossa. It represents the insertion site of the costoclavicular ligament( yellow), which extends from first rib (red) to the proximal clavicle (blue).
Is a normal variant and should not to be mistaken for an osteolytic lesion.

It occurs in 30% of males and 5% of females. It is more common in the young and becomes less visible with age.

Final diagnosis: rhomboid fossa of right clavicle

Congratulations to Faelivrin, who made the correct diagnosis

Teaching point: it is important to know the most common normal variants of the chest, to avoid confusing them with pathology.

Cáceres’ Corner Case 222 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Showing today preoperative radiographs of 57-year-old man with a torn knee cartilage. Sorry about the poor quality of the lateral view.
What do you see?

Come back on Friday to see the answer!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiograph show widening of the right superior mediastinum (A, arrow), imprinting the tracheal wall (A, red arrow).
In the lateral view there is increased opacity of Raider triangle (B, circle) with slight bowing of the posterior tracheal wall (B, red arrow).

The main causes of occupation of Raider triangle are two: either esophageal disease or congenital malformation of the aortic arch. The last one is the most likely, given the findings in the PA view.
 
Enhanced CT confirms a right aortic arch (C-D, arrows), crossing behind the trachea (C-E, red arrows) and causing the opacity in Raider triangle.

Findings are better seen in the 3-D reconstruction (F).

Final diagnosis: right aortic arch
 
Congratulations to Jolanta who made the correct diagnosis (my initial impression in the plain film was double aortic arch, so I will award another prize to Faelivrin for being wrong with me).
 
Teaching point: this case does not look very exciting, but right aortic arch is very common, and it is important to avoid confusing it with a mediastinal mass.
 
If you want to know more about malformations of the aortic arch, look up the article by Hanneman, Newman and Chan: Congenital variants and anomalies of the aortic arch, RadioGraphics 2017; 37:32–51

Cáceres’ Corner Case 220 – SOLVED


Dear Friends,

I am showing today a case seen last week. Radiographs belong to a 35-year-old man with fever. 

What do you see?

The answer will be published on Friday.

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows widening of the superior mediastinum (A, arrows). There is moderate prominence of both hila (A, red arrows) and two rounded opacities in the inferior aspect of the right hilum (A, yellow arrows). The lateral view shows convex bumps in the left hilum (B, red arrows).
Findings in both views are practically pathognomonic of mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathies.

Changes in the PA radiograph are more evident when comparing with a previous film taken two years earlier.

In this case, lymphoma is the best possibility. For the sake of the patient I hoped it was infectious mononucleosis. Analysis discovered immature cells in the bloodstream. Further workup confirmed the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
 
Final diagnosis: acute lymphoblastic leukemia with enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes.
 
Many of you discovered the enlarged lymph nodes, which makes me very proud.
Kudos for Amal Mahran, who was the first to give a detailed description.
 
Teaching point: I believe this case emphasizes the importance of comparing with previous studies. If I had shown the previous PA chest, I am sure the percentage of correct answers would had been close to one hundred percent.

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Second Session – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting the leading case of the second webinar. The PA radiograph belongs to a 62-year-old man with hemoptysis.

Is the radiograph abnormal?
If so, what do you see?

Starting this week, I have decided to stop giving live webinars. They will be recorded and published at the end of the week, together with the answer to the case. You can see the first session here

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows convexity of the aorto-pulmonary window (A, arrow) and an opacity in the upper left hilum (A, red arrow). The findings were not present in a film taken three years earlier (B, circle) and suggest a pulmonary process with mediastinal adenopathy.

Findings were overlooked and the chest was read as normal. Six months later the patient returned with acute right chest pain. PA chest shows two triangular pleural-based opacities (C, arrows) suggestive of Hampton’s humps. The convexity at the APW is larger (C, green arrow) and the hilar opacity has increased in size (C, red arrow).

Coronal CT shows the typical appearance of pulmonary infarcts at the right lung base (D, arrows). There is large adenopathy at the APW (D, green arrow) accompanied by a lung mass (D, red arrow).

Final diagnosis: carcinoma of the lung with mediastinal metastases and associated pulmonary infarcts.
 
Congratulations to S, who made a brilliant diagnosis.
 
Teaching point: Remember the importance of checklists. If a checklist had been used in the initial radiography, a CT would had been taken and the tumor would had been discovered earlier

If you would like to learn more about this subject, check the webinar Prof. Cáceres recorded explaining this cases and others! You can also check the first webinar here.

Emergency #8 – Long case

83-year-old man with:
* Painful swelling in the right groin
* No fever
* Nausea but no vomiting, difficulty passing stools
* Swelling not reducible

What do you see? Is it an incarcerated inguinal hernia?

Click here to see the images


Click here to see the answer

Imaging findings

* Right-sided inguinal hernia with intestines inside
* Mechanical small bowel obstruction proximal of hernia
* Normal enhancement of the bowel wall

No signs of ischemia.

Differential diagnosis

Mechanical small bowel obstruction: Adhesions/bands–volvulus–internal hernia–obstructing tumour/tumoural implants–other hernia’s–congenital or acquired stenosis

Groin swelling: Adenopathy–femoral hernia–psoas abscess–retracted testicle

Management

If no signs of ischemia are present:
* Careful manual reduction attempt
* If not successful: emergency surgery (risk of strangulation)

If signs of ischemia are present:
* Emergency surgery

Key points

Incarceration only means the hernia is not reducible and does not say anything about the content. An incarcerated inguinal hernia can also contain abdominal fat without bowel loops

Incarcerated hernia can turn into strangulated hernia and lead to small bowel obstruction

Carefully inspect the enhancement of the implicated loop of small bowel

Lack of enhancement is an early sign of ischemia (strangulation) and an indication for urgent surgery

Get free registration for ECR 2019!

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