Emergency #10 – Long case

23-year-old male:
* Blunt force trauma of the abdomen
* Patient is hemodynamically stable

What do you see?

Arterial phase

Venous phase

Arterial phase

Venous phase

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Findings:

* Linear zone of hypodensity through the pancreatic body on both phases
* Surrounding fluid with relatively high-density retroperitoneal AND intraperitoneal

Note that the pancreas may appear normal in 20%-40% of patients when CT is performed within 12 h after trauma
MRCP may be useful to evaluate the integrity of the pancreatic duct

Pancreatic fracture:

* Complete laceration of the pancreatic body: AAST Grade III
* Require surgery within 24h
* Possible complications: fistula, pseudocyst, pancreatitis, abscesses, hemorrhage, pseudo-aneurysm
* Usually, injuries of other organs as well

Treatment in this case: distal pancreatectomy and closing of main pancreatic duct transsection, discharge to hospital in home country after 2 weeks

Emergency #9 – Long case

60-year-old female:
* Known with hypertension
* Acute pain on the chest
* X-ray
* Abnormal?
* Differential Diagnosis: No.

What should we think of and do next?

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Clinically suspect for aortic dissection

What protocol?
Non-enhanced chest CT, followed by CT angiography chest-abdomen

No NECT was made:

Imaging findings and key messages

* Soft tissue surrounding ascending aorta from the root, continuing around the aortic arch and descending aorta
* Between the soft-tissue band and the intraluminal contrast, we see intimal calcifications, these are NOT displaced outwards
* At some spots, there is contrast extravasation in the soft tissue
* No intimal tear or dissection flap is seen
* Slight pericardial effusion

What is the diagnosis?

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Aortic intramural hematoma.

Treatment is like an aortic dissection with anti-hypertensive medication. In this case, it is a type A since the mural hematoma is seen proximal to the left subclavian artery, involving the ascending aorta.

Differential Diagnosis

* Thrombosed false lumen in classic aortic dissection: Typically spirals longitudinally around the aorta, whereas an intramural haematoma usually maintains a constant circumferential relationship with the aortic wall

* Aortitis: Typically shows concentric uniform thickening of the aortic wall with or without peri-aortic inflammatory stranding, whereas an intramural haematoma is often eccentric in configuration

Treatment/Prognosis

* If an intramural haematoma involves the ascending aorta (Stanford A), treatment is surgical to prevent rupture and progression to a classic aortic dissection

* Conservative management is indicated for an intramural haematoma of the descending aorta (Stanford B)
* 77% of intramural haematomas regress at 3 years
* Survival of >90% at 5 years

* Untreated, an intramural haematoma can be life-threatening as it can lead to: aortic rupture, aortic dissection, aortic aneurysm.

Emergency #8 – Long case

83-year-old man with:
* Painful swelling in the right groin
* No fever
* Nausea but no vomiting, difficulty passing stools
* Swelling not reducible

What do you see? Is it an incarcerated inguinal hernia?

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Imaging findings

* Right-sided inguinal hernia with intestines inside
* Mechanical small bowel obstruction proximal of hernia
* Normal enhancement of the bowel wall

No signs of ischemia.

Differential diagnosis

Mechanical small bowel obstruction: Adhesions/bands–volvulus–internal hernia–obstructing tumour/tumoural implants–other hernia’s–congenital or acquired stenosis

Groin swelling: Adenopathy–femoral hernia–psoas abscess–retracted testicle

Management

If no signs of ischemia are present:
* Careful manual reduction attempt
* If not successful: emergency surgery (risk of strangulation)

If signs of ischemia are present:
* Emergency surgery

Key points

Incarceration only means the hernia is not reducible and does not say anything about the content. An incarcerated inguinal hernia can also contain abdominal fat without bowel loops

Incarcerated hernia can turn into strangulated hernia and lead to small bowel obstruction

Carefully inspect the enhancement of the implicated loop of small bowel

Lack of enhancement is an early sign of ischemia (strangulation) and an indication for urgent surgery

Emergency #7 – Long case

21-year-old male
* High-energy trauma (HET)
* Car vs. car

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What do you see?

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Findings:

* Complex transverse and longitudinal type petrous temporal bone fracture.
* Involvement of inner ear (cochlea, posterior semicircular canal) round window and facial canal.
* Fracture through middle ear ossicular chain (malleolus and incus).
* Soft tissue in middle ear and filled mastoid air cells.
* Some free air bubbles intracranial (pneumocephalus).
* Fracture continuation (not shown here) in temporal, occipital and parietal bone, occipital condyles.

Late complications:
* Sensory and conductive hearing loss
* Facial nerve involvement

Teaching point: Beware of fracture through carotid canal (not shown here), indication to perform additional CTA to look for carotid dissection
Teaching point: Beware of rupture of tegmen tympani, for late complication CSF leakage otorrhoea, with probable CSF hypotension.