Musculoskeletal #8 – Flash card

What do you see on the following images?

CT scout view

CT soft tissue window

CT bone window

Click here to see the answer

Skull eosinophilic granuloma
Well defined lytic lesion with scalloped edges. It involves both the inner and outer table. Narrow zone of transition, no cortical breakthrough and no soft tissue component.

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook 153 – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Seventh Session

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting the leading images of the seventh webinar. They belong to a 66-year-old man with vague chest complaints. Chest was read as normal, but there is a visible abnormality, difficult to see.
Can you see it?

Remember, you can see the previous sessions of the webinar in our youtube channel. We will published the answer to this question (and the webinar) on Friday.

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiograph (A) is unremarkable. In the lateral view there is a nodule projected over the mid-thoracic spine (B, arrow). The nodule was overlooked, and the examination was read as normal.

One year later the nodule has increased in size (C, arrow) and has become visible behind the heart in the PA view (D, arrow). It was diagnosed as adenocarcinoma and liver metastases were found.

Two years later, CT and PET-CT show marked progression of the liver metastases.

Final diagnosis: lung adenocarcinoma missed in the first chest radiographs, with widespread metastases two years later
 
Congratulations to Spat, who discovered the initial nodule.
 
Teaching point: remember to look at the dorsal spine in the lateral view. By doing so, you may discover early disease, with great benefit for the patient.

Cáceres’ Corner Case 220 – SOLVED


Dear Friends,

I am showing today a case seen last week. Radiographs belong to a 35-year-old man with fever. 

What do you see?

The answer will be published on Friday.

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows widening of the superior mediastinum (A, arrows). There is moderate prominence of both hila (A, red arrows) and two rounded opacities in the inferior aspect of the right hilum (A, yellow arrows). The lateral view shows convex bumps in the left hilum (B, red arrows).
Findings in both views are practically pathognomonic of mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathies.

Changes in the PA radiograph are more evident when comparing with a previous film taken two years earlier.

In this case, lymphoma is the best possibility. For the sake of the patient I hoped it was infectious mononucleosis. Analysis discovered immature cells in the bloodstream. Further workup confirmed the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
 
Final diagnosis: acute lymphoblastic leukemia with enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes.
 
Many of you discovered the enlarged lymph nodes, which makes me very proud.
Kudos for Amal Mahran, who was the first to give a detailed description.
 
Teaching point: I believe this case emphasizes the importance of comparing with previous studies. If I had shown the previous PA chest, I am sure the percentage of correct answers would had been close to one hundred percent.

Cáceres’ Corner Case 219 – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,
Today’s images belong to a 67-year-old woman with pain in the chest.
What do you see?

More images will be presented next Wednesday and the answer will be published on Friday, as usual.

Click here to see more images

Dear Friends,

Showing additional axial CT images of the patient.
What do you see?

Click here for the solution

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows a lytic lesion of the 3rd right rib, accompanied by an extrapulmonary sign (A, circle). Lateral view (not shown) is unremarkable.

The lesion is more obvious in the cone-down view (B, circle), specially when compared to a previous study (C, circle).

Axial CT confirms a permeative lesion of the rib (D-E, arrows), as well as lytic lesion in the posterior elements of the 4th thoracic vertebra (E, red arrow). A serendipitous finding is a nodule in the medial quadrant of the left breast (F, arrow), demonstrated in a subsequent mammography (G, arrow) and confirmed to be a carcinoma.

Final diagnosis: carcinoma of the breast with osseous metastases
 
Congratulations to Diogo who saw and described the rib lesion in the plain film.
 
Teaching point:remember that our most common error is missing obvious lesions.
Checklists help to correct oversights. I believe the rib lesion could have been found if you had applied the checklist recommended in webinar one (H).

Abdominal #7 – Long case

70-year-old female:

* Presents with acute abdominal pain
* Previous history adnex extirpation and appendectomy
* No raised inflammatory parameters
* No peristalsis
* CT abdomen with IV contrast

What do you see?

Click here to see the answer:

Dilated small bowel loops, radiating distribution (“Bunch of grapes”) with impressive mesenterial venous engorgement and edema in the centre. Ascites perihepatic and in Douglas. Loss of bowel enhancement.

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Closed loop obstruction with bowel ischemia.

Teaching point

Seek for 2 (!) calibre changes next to each other to confirm SBO on basis of Closed loop obstruction.

Peroperative 1 meter of necrotic small bowel was resected.