Musculoskeletal #3 – Long case

Axial CT abdomen bone window

Axial CT abdomen soft tissue window

Where is the lesion?

Left iliac bone

What are the radiological characteristics/findings?

Large lytic lesion with wide zone of transition, cortical destruction, and large soft tissue component.
No specific matrix.

What is the differential diagnosis of an aggressive iliac bone lesion?

* Metastasis
* Plasmacytoma: solitary plasma cell tumor expansile lytic lesion with bone destruction and soft tissue component. Usually shows low signal intensity on T2 with variable post contrast enhancement. 
* Chondrosarcoma: malignant cartilage tumor destructive lytic lesion with intralesional rings and arcs calcification (chondroid matrix). High signal intensity on T2. 

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Plasmacytoma

Cáceres’ Corner Case 208 – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Presenting today radiographs of a 65-year-old man with back pain.

What do you see?

Click here to see the images


Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows an ill-defined opacity in the right middle lung field (A, asterisk), located in the anterior clear space in the lateral view (B, arrows). The anterior arch of the 4th right rib is missing.

A cone down view demonstrates an expanding lytic lesion in the anterior arch of the 4th right rib (C, asterisk), confirmed with CT (D and E, red arrows).

I thought this was an easy case, but I am disappointed because some of you missed a collapsed vertebra (F, circle), not present three years earlier (G, circle). Sagittal CT confirms it as well as additional affectation of L1 and posterior elements of D10 (H, red arrows).

In a patient with a port-a-cath, the presence of multiple lytic lesion suggests metastatic disease as the first possibility.
 
Final diagnosis: Carcinoma of esophagus with bone metastases

Congratulations to Andy, who was the first and to Archana Reddy.t who discovered the collapsed vertebra.

Teaching point: this case is similar to the previous one and the teaching point is the same: look at the underlying rib. And, above all, don’t forget to examine the rest of the bones!

Abdominal #2 – Long case

We present the case of a 31-year-old woman with:
* Nausea and vomiting since three days
* Unable to eat or drink without vomiting
* Epigastric pain after eating
* Feels weak

* No prior trauma or illness
* No fever, no diarreha, no hematemesis or bloody stools
* No other family members ill

See below the laboratory findings:

What do you think?

Click here to see the answer

Signs of dehydration with secondary acute renal impairment and electrolyte disorders

Abdominals X-Ray were performed:

What do you see on the X-Rays?

Click here to see the answer
Apparent elevation of the right hemidiaphragm with obscuration of the right cardiac border

Air – fluid level at the right upper quadrant: free air?
Absense of gastric air and fluid-air level
Colonic air at the right upper quadrant (Chilaiditi)

Apparent soft tissue mass at the right upper quadrant

Elongated right liver lobe (Riedel lobe)
Instability of the symphysis pubis

Summary

* Apparent elevation of the right hemidiaphragm with obscuration of the right cardiac border
* Air – fluid level at the right upper quadrant: free air?
* Colonic air at the right upper quadrant (Chilaiditi)
* Apparent soft tissue mass at the right upper quadrant

* No apparent dilated bowel loops
* Elongated right liver lobe (Riedel lobe)
* Instability of the symphysis pubis

Differential diagnosis of a large amount of air in the RUQ

* Pneumoperitoneum
* Subphrenic abscess
* Hepatic abscess
* Anterior interposition of colon to the liver

* Loculated pneumothorax (mimick)
* Situs inversus – gastric air (mimick)
* Pneumobilia, portal venous gas (smaller amount)

Images from an abdominal CT-scan:

What do you see on the CT images?

Click here to see the answer
Anterior defect in the right hemidiaphragm

Partial herniation of stomach (blue arrow) and transverse colon (green arrow)

Gastric outlet obstruction due to compression of the pyloric region (red arrow),with secundary dilatation with fluid (blue arrows)

Normal position of the gastro-esophageal junction and hiatus

Collapse of the right middle lobe (green arrow) and partial collapse of the right lower lobe (blue arrow).

Summary

* Anterior defect in the right hemidiaphragm
* Partial herniation of stomach and transverse colon
* Gastric outlet obstruction due to compression of the pyloric region of the stomach, with secundary dilatation with fluid
* Normal position of the gastro-esophageal junction and hiatus
* No signs of ischemia
* Collapse of the right middle lobe and partial collapse of the right lower lobe.

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Click here to see the answer

Morgagni hernia of the diaphragm

Patient had a laparoscopic reduction of the hernia with mesh closure of the defect. No signs of ischemia at surgery.
Uneventful recovery with resolution of pain and normal intake the day after.

Morgagni hernia

* Rare congenital diaphragmatic hernia (<5% of all CDH)
* Anterior (retrosternal)
* Right-sided (90%)
* Usually small
* +/- 30% symptomatic: respiratory distress (newborn), recurrent chest infections, abdominal symptoms
* Contents: omental fat, transverse colon (60%), stomach (12%)

* Treatment: surgical repair
> In symptomatic cases, some say also in asymptomatic cases: prevention of strangulation of hernia contents
*Prognosis: good

* Differential diagnosis:
> Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture
> Diaphragmatic eventration / weakness / paralysis (abnormal contour / position of the dome)
> Cardiophrenic angle lesions ( pericardial fat pad, cyst, lipomatosis, tumor)

Cáceres’ Corner Case 207 – SOLVED!

Dear Friends, 

Today I am presenting a case given to me by my good friend José Luis López Moreno. The PA radiograph belongs to a 77-year-old woman with pain in the right hemithorax.
What do you see?

More images will be shown on Wednesday.

Dear Friends,

showing today axial and coronal CT.
What do you think?

Click here to see more images


Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiographs shows an ovoid opacity in the right lung (A, arrow), that parallels the path of the anterior ribs. Careful observation demonstrates that the third and fifth anterior ribs are visible (B, red arrows), whereas the anterior fourth rib is absent (B, asterisks). An additional finding is moderated flattening of D11 and D12 (A, circle). The findings suggest multicentric bone lesions.

Enhanced axial and coronal CT confirm a lytic expanding lesion of the anterior fourth rib (C and D, arrows), better seen in the 3-D reconstructions (E and F, arrows).

In an adult, lytic expanding rib lesions are usually either metastases (thyroid, renal cell carcinoma) or multiple myeloma. Further studies confirmed a myeloma.
 
Final diagnosis: multiple myeloma affecting the right fourth rib and several thoracic and lumbar vertebrae.
 
Congratulations to Wafaa who suggested the diagnosis in the plain film and to VL who discovered the collapsed vertebrae.
 
Teaching point: remember to look at the underlying rib when facing a pleural/chest wall lesion. An affected rib will narrow down your diagnostic options. And don’t forget satisfaction of search (collapsed vertebrae in this case).