Musculoskeletal #26

Describe the abnormality

Bilateral sacroiliac joint space narrowing, subchondral erosions, subchondral sclerosis, and subchondral fatty marrow infiltration.

What is the differential diagnosis?

Bilateral symmetrical:
Ankylosing spondylitis
Inflammatory bowel disease. 

Bilateral asymmetrical:
Psoriasis
Reactive arthritis (Reiter syndrome) 

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Ankylosing spondylitis

What are the markers of active inflammation?

Erosions with high signal intensity on STIR or T2- weighted images, subchondral edema, and enhancement within or adjacent to the sacroiliac joint.

What are the markers of chronic disease?

Low signal intensity on T1- and T2- weighted images, subchondral sclerosis, narrowing of the joint spaces, bone bridging, and ankylosis.

Neuroradiology #33

72-year-old male:
– With known pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor
– New onset dorsal pain

What do you see?

Vertebral blastic metastasis from pulmonary neuroendocrine origin presenting as an ivory vertebra.

IVORY VERTEBRAE (differential)

– Paget
– Lymphoma
– Metastasis on men: prostate
– Matastesis on women: breast

Do not forget: transitional cell carcinomas, neuroendocrine tumours, medullary thyroid carcinoma and osteosarcoma.

Emergency #33

83-year-old female:
– Acute loss of function right arm and leg
– Bleeding? Ischemia?

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Dense left medial cerebral artery with subtle obscuring of grey-white matter interface temporal operculum of insula; early ischemia.

CTA: Occlusion M1 Patient received IV thrombolysis and her symptoms improved

Emergency #32

53-year-old male:
– Hemodialysis patient
– Presents with a very large scrotum, size of a football
– Patient is not sick, no fever
– Laboratory results are normal
– US: Incarcerated inguinal hernia? Hydrocele? Malignancy?

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Diagnosis: Extensive scrotal lymphoedema

– Extensive scrotal wall thickening associated with diffuse lymphoedema extending to the base of penis not involving the penile corpora
– No extension into the deep subcutaneous tissue planes, inguinal canal, or muscles
– No extension to the groin or lower abdomen
– No inguinal adenopathy
– Both testicles are morphologically normal with no associated hydroceles
– There is no associated soft-tissue mass

Neuroradiology #30

A 6-year-old boy presenting to emergency department with headache, nausea, and vomiting

What do you see?

Intra-axial cystic lesion with mass effect shows CSF signal intensity on all sequences, without enhancement and perilesional edema

Differential diagnosis include

* Parasitic diseases (hydatid cyst) spheric
* Neuroglial cyst may have surrounding gliosis
* Porencephalic cyst surrounding gliosis, communicates with ventricle

Same cystic lesion in superior lobe of left lung

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Hydatid cyst disease
Both lesions were treated by surgery

Emergency #27 – Flashcard

Elbow pain after a fall. What do you see?

Click here to see the answer

Findings

Large joint effusion with the displacement of the anterior fat pad. Mild posterior soft tissue swelling over the olecranon. Fracture line along the lateral aspect of the radial neck. Radial head and articular surface are normal

Diagnosis

Nondisplaced radial head fracture

Teaching points

– Check not only the bones and joints but also the soft tissues
– Search and interpret the findings in two different positions
– Pain always withholds a story behind

Head and Neck #4 – Flashcard

CT – Coronal + C
CT – Axial + C
Where is the abnormality?​

Left side of the neck.

How can the abnormality be described?​

Multiple enlarged neck clustered lymph nodes, with some of them showing necrosis.

What is the differential diagnosis?

Infectious lymphadenitis: such as TB or pyogenic lymphadenitis.
Metastasis: particularly from head and neck malignancies.
Treated lymphoma or lymphoma in immune compromised patient.

What is the final diagnosis

TB lymphadenitis

Emergency #26 – Flashcard

A 30-year-old female with right shoulder pain.

4 images of the right shoulder were obtained (axillar, Y-view, internal rotation, external rotation)

Click here to see the images
Y-view

Internal rotation
External rotation
Findings:

Findings


Right shoulder: There is a nondisplaced fracture involving the inferior aspect of the glenoid, with involvement of the articular surface. Glenohumeral joint shows normal alignment. Acromioclavicular joint is normal. No soft-tissue calcification. No fracture or dislocation

What is the most likely diagnosis?

The most likely diagnosis is Hill-Sachs lesion

Hill-Sachs lesions are a posterolateral humeral head compression fracture. Typically occurs secondary to recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations. It is often associated with a Bankart lesion of the glenoid

Internal Rotation
External Rotation

These lesions are best seen following relocation of the joint. It appears as a sclerotic line running vertically from the top of the humeral head towards the shaft. A wedge defect may be evident in large lesions. The lesions are better appreciated on internal rotation views

Neuroradiology #24 – Flashcard

89-year-old female patient with aplastic anemia. Showing CT images without contrast media. What do you see?

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CT images without contrast media: Subacute isodense right subdural hematoma, revealed with narrowing of right cerebral hemispheric sulci and right lateral ventricle and minimal midline shift (red arrows), acute left subdural hematoma (blue arrow)