Emergency #33

83-year-old female:
– Acute loss of function right arm and leg
– Bleeding? Ischemia?

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Dense left medial cerebral artery with subtle obscuring of grey-white matter interface temporal operculum of insula; early ischemia.

CTA: Occlusion M1 Patient received IV thrombolysis and her symptoms improved

Emergency #32

53-year-old male:
– Hemodialysis patient
– Presents with a very large scrotum, size of a football
– Patient is not sick, no fever
– Laboratory results are normal
– US: Incarcerated inguinal hernia? Hydrocele? Malignancy?

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Diagnosis: Extensive scrotal lymphoedema

– Extensive scrotal wall thickening associated with diffuse lymphoedema extending to the base of penis not involving the penile corpora
– No extension into the deep subcutaneous tissue planes, inguinal canal, or muscles
– No extension to the groin or lower abdomen
– No inguinal adenopathy
– Both testicles are morphologically normal with no associated hydroceles
– There is no associated soft-tissue mass

Emergency #27 – Flashcard

Elbow pain after a fall. What do you see?

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Findings

Large joint effusion with the displacement of the anterior fat pad. Mild posterior soft tissue swelling over the olecranon. Fracture line along the lateral aspect of the radial neck. Radial head and articular surface are normal

Diagnosis

Nondisplaced radial head fracture

Teaching points

– Check not only the bones and joints but also the soft tissues
– Search and interpret the findings in two different positions
– Pain always withholds a story behind

Emergency #26 – Flashcard

A 30-year-old female with right shoulder pain.

4 images of the right shoulder were obtained (axillar, Y-view, internal rotation, external rotation)

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Y-view

Internal rotation
External rotation
Findings:

Findings


Right shoulder: There is a nondisplaced fracture involving the inferior aspect of the glenoid, with involvement of the articular surface. Glenohumeral joint shows normal alignment. Acromioclavicular joint is normal. No soft-tissue calcification. No fracture or dislocation

What is the most likely diagnosis?

The most likely diagnosis is Hill-Sachs lesion

Hill-Sachs lesions are a posterolateral humeral head compression fracture. Typically occurs secondary to recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations. It is often associated with a Bankart lesion of the glenoid

Internal Rotation
External Rotation

These lesions are best seen following relocation of the joint. It appears as a sclerotic line running vertically from the top of the humeral head towards the shaft. A wedge defect may be evident in large lesions. The lesions are better appreciated on internal rotation views

Emergency #24 – Flashcard

A 43-year-old man with inflammation and lower abdominal pain:

What do you see?

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* Inflammatory wall thickening of the sigmoid colon.
* Multiple diverticula, but one enlarged with thickened enhancing wall (arrow).
* Surrounding haziness of the mesosigmoid fat.
* Peritoneal accentuation

Typical image of diverticulitis, in a typical location with typical presentation

Teaching point

Look for signs of perforation or abscess formation

Emergency #22 – Long case

81-year-old male:

* Severe pain abdomen
* Tender abdomen
* Clinical ileus

What do you see?

Diagnosis

Mechanical ileus with caliber change in ileum. Distended stomach with air in the major curvature of the wall, with air bubble outside lumen, suspect for pneumatosis intestinalis. Extended air in left portal vein branches and in central portal vein (portal venous gas peripheral, gas in bile ducts central).

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What additional findings do you see?

1. Contained rupture AAA with slowly progressive lytic destruction and remodeling of lumbar spine
2. Gall stones