Head and Neck #5

66-year-old female:
– Feels a lump in the neck when swallowing

In what space houses this lesion?

Mass in the right parapharyngeal space or deep part of parotid space. No parapharyngeal fat is visible, so either the lesion displaces the fat or it arises from it. It is certainly not from the carotid space, since the carotid arteries are displaced posteriorly. It is also not from the mucosal space since it compresses the lateral oropharyngeal wall, instead of arising from it.

Do you want further imaging to make a diagnosis and what?

MRI will provide you more details in head and neck lesions where the lesion arises from exactly, and what the origin is. MRI is made with T1, T2, and T1 with Gad and fat suppression.

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What is your differential diagnosis?

Origin from deep parotid lobe, so DD benign or malignant salivary gland tumor, such as pleiomorphic adenoma, adenoid cystic of mucoepidermoid cell carcinoma. Radiologists are not good in differentiating benign from malignant lesions on MRI. Histopathology has to be done. DWI will help you a little, in that, malignant lesions have often lower ADC values, but also Wharthin tumors do so. DD rare schwannoma arises from V3 (mandibular nerve) in the true parapharyngeal space.

We performed ultrasound and cytologic punction. This turned out to be a fairly rare acinic cell carcinoma.

Teaching point:

Malignant tumors of the salivary glands are well delineated and do not have to present as ill-defined lesions, nor have to have lymph node metastasis or perineural spread

Musculoskeletal #24

48-year-old male:
– Heavy smoker
– Depressive syndrome

Found lying unconscious at home, in lateral position (opioid overdose)
Erythema and limited movement of the left shoulder
Blood test: CK 7949 u/l. Negative blood and aspiration cultures (no infection)

What do you see?

Findings

CT: Low attenuation area involving the posterior aspect of the deltoid muscle and the lateral aspect of the pectoralis major muscle. Superficial and deep fascia edema. No enhancing walls neither gas is seen.

MRI: Postcontrast T1FS images show hypointense unenhancing central muscle fibers surrounded by thick rim enhancement involving the posterior deltoid, teres minor, and pectoralis major muscles . Thickened and hyperenhancing adjacent fascia and reactive muscle edema are also noted.

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Rhabdomyolysis (type 2: myonecrosis)
– Injury to skeletal muscle that involves leakage of large quantities of potentially toxic substances into plasma.
– Type 1: homogeneous signal changes and contrast enhancement. Ischemic or reversible ischemic reaction.
– Type 2: homogeneous or heterogeneous signal changes and rim enhancement. Irreversible muscular necrosis (myonecrosis).

– Deep tissue injury: severe pressure ulcer, characterized by necrotic tissue mass under intact skin.

– CK > 1000 – 5000 iu/l “cut-off”.

– Risk factors: postoperative patients (position), obesity, male gender, diabetes, surgical bleeding…

Abdominal #10

82-yearold patient:
– Presenting with hematuria

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Enhancing mass in the left renal pelvis, most likely TCC

What is the treatment?

Left total nephroureterectomy and bladder cuff excision

Microscopy result: Transitional Cell Carcinoma of 2,5 cm in the renal pelvis, low grade.
TNM classification Pyelum-Ureter (8th edition UICC): pTa.

Teaching Points

Teaching points

– The vast majority of renal pelvis and ureter tumours are transitional cell carcinoma (> 90%), the remainder of tumours are squamous cell carcinoma (< 10%) and adenocarcinoma (< 1%) Transitional cell carcinoma much more commonly occurs in the bladder than in the renal pelvis or ureter - Synchronous and metachronous tumours are frequent because TCC is caused by toxic exposure through for example cigarette smoking - TCC of the renal pelvis can spread to the kidney and intraluminal seeding to more caudal parts of the ureter and to the bladder is common => always look for other space occupying lesions

– For these reasons, an excretory phase is always useful when a kidney mass is suspected, as TCC’s represent 10 to 15% of renal tumours

– CT scan protocol: non enhanced CT, enhanced CT (70-90 sec), delayed phase (10-15 mins)

Musculoskeletal #23

89-year-old patient with groin mass

What do you see?

Imaging Findings

Agressive isquion mass with bone destruction, soft tissue component, necrosis and osteid matrix.

In the staging CT: Vertebral and skull signs of paget disease (Bone marrow heterogenity with lytic and sclerotic foci, cortical thikening and bone expansion; as well as partial pagetiic spinal block)

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Diagnosis

Pagetic secondary osteosarcoma on a patient with polyostotic bone paget.

Teaching Points

Osteosarcoma hallmarks are agressive bone mass with osteoid matriz.It can be primary or secondary (mainly on pagetic or radiated bone)
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Emergency #32

53-year-old male:
– Hemodialysis patient
– Presents with a very large scrotum, size of a football
– Patient is not sick, no fever
– Laboratory results are normal
– US: Incarcerated inguinal hernia? Hydrocele? Malignancy?

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Diagnosis: Extensive scrotal lymphoedema

– Extensive scrotal wall thickening associated with diffuse lymphoedema extending to the base of penis not involving the penile corpora
– No extension into the deep subcutaneous tissue planes, inguinal canal, or muscles
– No extension to the groin or lower abdomen
– No inguinal adenopathy
– Both testicles are morphologically normal with no associated hydroceles
– There is no associated soft-tissue mass

Neuroradiology #30

A 6-year-old boy presenting to emergency department with headache, nausea, and vomiting

What do you see?

Intra-axial cystic lesion with mass effect shows CSF signal intensity on all sequences, without enhancement and perilesional edema

Differential diagnosis include

* Parasitic diseases (hydatid cyst) spheric
* Neuroglial cyst may have surrounding gliosis
* Porencephalic cyst surrounding gliosis, communicates with ventricle

Same cystic lesion in superior lobe of left lung

What is the most likely diagnosis?

Hydatid cyst disease
Both lesions were treated by surgery

Musculoskeletal #20

72-year-old alcoholic patient with intractable dorsal pain and legs numbness and weakness.

What do you see?

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IMAGING FINDINGS:

Thoracic spine compression fracture with posterior displacement of the posterior wall of the vertebral body compromising the spinal canal, cord compression and associated myelopathy. T2W image shows fluid and hypointense bubble-like artifact consistent with vacuum cleft in the collapsed anterior vertebral body

DIAGNOSIS:

Kümmel disease (osteonecrosis and collapse of the vertebral body)

TEACHING POINTS:

Intravertebral vacuum cleft and fluid within the collapsed vertebral body is a characteristic feature
Differential diagnosis includes a pathologic (tumoral) fracture, and the presence of air strongly favors osteonecrosis

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MR T2-weighted and CT images to highlight the characteristic features of Kümmel disease

Intravertebral fluid seen on T2 image and air on CT image

Neuroradiology #28

A 24-year-old female patient with headache. What do you see?

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Multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumor (MVNT): Cortical ribbon-juxtacortical T2 hyperintense (a-b) round to oval nodular lesions, not suppressed on FLAIR images (c) and usually no enhancement (d) may show fair enhancement rarely, without diffusion restriction (not shown)