Cáceres’ Corner Case 241 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today’s radiographs belong to a 24-year-old woman with cough and fever. What do you see?

More images will be shown next Wednesday and the answer will be published on Friday.

Click here to see Monday images


Dear Friends,

Showing today CT images of the chest. What do you think?

Click here to see the new images

Click here to see the answer

Findings: Chest radiographs show air-space disease in the right lower lobe (A-B, arrows). There is marked widening of the right paratracheal line (A, red arrow) suggestive of mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

Axial CT with lung window shows RLL air-space disease without cavitation (C, arrow). Mediastinal window at different levels confirms enlarged paratracheal, subcarinal and neck lymph nodes with hypodense center (D-F, red arrows). These findings should suggest active tuberculosis as the first possibility.
Although TB usually affects upper lobes, isolated involvement of lower lobes occurs in about 7% of cases.
 
Mycobacterium tuberculosis was found in the sputum.

Final diagnosis: active TB.
 
Congratulations to Archanareddyt who was the first to make the diagnosis.
 
 Teaching point: lymph nodes with hypodense center may occur in several processes (treated tumors, Whipple’s, etc.), but in the appropriate clinical situation, the first diagnostic consideration should be tuberculosis.

Cáceres’ Corner Case 239 – SOLVED


Dear Friends,

Today’s case has been provided by my good friend Alberto Villanueva. PA radiograph of a 55-year-old male, taken during a workup for rectal carcinoma.

Diagnosis:

1. Metastasis
2. Pericardial cyst
3. Carcinoma of the lung
4. None of the above

More images will be shown next Wednesday. What do you see?

Click here to see images shown on Monday


Dear Friends,

in my opinion it is difficult to determine in the plain film the origin of large masses adjacent to the mediastinum. I am showing today coronal and axial enhanced CTs.

What do you think?

Click here to see more images


Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiograph shows a rounded well-defined mass at the costophrenic angle in the lower left hemithorax (A, arrow). We can infer that the mass is anterior because is displacing the heart towards the right and it does not obliterate the para-aortic line.
In my opinion, when a large mass if adjacent to the midline it is difficult to determine whether it is mediastinal or pulmonary.

Coronal and axial enhanced CT show a solid mediastinal mass with areas of necrosis (B-C, arrows). The most common solid lesion in the cardiophrenic angle are enlarged lymph nodes, which usually are multiple and not very large. In big soft-tissue tumors of this area a thymic origin should be suspected. Although thymic tumors originate in the anterior superior mediastinum, they may slide down along the mediastinal planes and appear at the cardiophrenic angle in the lower mediastinum. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of thymoma.

Final diagnosis: mediastinal thymoma

Congratulations to Mohamed Abdulghaffarand MK who were the first to suggest the correct diagnosis

Teaching point: Remember that CT is very helpful in diagnosing cardiophrenic angle masses according to their radiographic density: fat (pericardial fat pad, Morgagni’s hernia); fluid (pericardial cyst) and soft-tissue ( lymphadenopahy and the occasional thymic tumour).

Cáceres Corner Case 236 – Vignette

Dear Friends,

Today’s radiographs belong to a 65-year-old woman with back pain. She was operated for myxoid liposarcoma of the lower limb seven years ago.

Do you see any abnormality?
If so, where is it?

1. Upper area
2. Middle area
3. Lower area
4. I don’t see it

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiograph shows a double contour of the aortic knob (A, arrow) which indicates a superimposed mediastinal mass either in front or behind the knob. Lateral view shows increased opacity of the upper thoracic spine (B, circle), suggesting a posterior mass.

Click here to see more images

Unenhanced CT was done. What would be your diagnosis?

1. Neurogenic tumor
2. Metastasis
3. Neurenteric cyst
4. Any of the above

Click here to see the answer

Findings: coronal and axial unenhanced CT show a posterior mediastinal mass (C-D, arrows). Of the three possible diagnosis, I would choose neurogenic tumor/cyst, because they are frequent in the posterior mediastinum.

Click here to see more images

MRI was done. Would you change your diagnosis?

1. Neurogenic tumor
2. Metastasis
3. Neurenteric cyst
4. Any of the above

Click here to see the answer

Findings: MRI discovers that the vertebral body is affected (E-F, arrows). This makes neurogenic tumor unlikely. There are visible vessels within the mass, which excludes a cyst. Since myxoid liposarcomas metastasize to the spine, the best possibility is metastasis.
At surgery, a metastatic focus from liposarcoma was found.

Final diagnosis: Metastasis from liposarcoma

This is an interesting case because in the PA radiograph the abnormality is partially hidden by the aortic knob and can be difficult to see (remember to use checklists!).

As a chest radiologist occupying the lower strata of the totem pole, I confess my profound ignorance of liposarcomas. Surfing the Internet I have discovered several papers that state that myxoid liposarcoma metastasizes frequently to the spine and that MRI is the method of choice to demonstrate vertebral metastases in these cases.
Now I can transmit my new-found knowledge to you.

Cáceres Corner Case 230 – Vignette

Dear friends,

Today’s radiographs belong to a 27-year-old with dyspnea.

Diagnosis:

1. Giant bulla
2. Emphysema
3. Loculated pneumothorax
4. Any of the above

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiograph shows overinflation of the lower right lung pushing the minor fissure upward (A, arrow), simulating partial RUL collapse. In the lateral view there is a circular line (B, red arrows) suggesting the wall of a giant bulla. The correct diagnosis is made by detecting overinflation of the left lower lung and scarce vascularity, an indication that we are not dealing with localized disease of RLL (giant bulla or pneumothorax) but with disease of both lower lobes. Therefore the correct diagnosis should be 3. Emphysema.

Another finding in favor of emphysema of lower lobes is redistribution of the pulmonary circulation in which the diameter of the vessels of upper lobes (B) is larger than those of the lower lobes (C).
Pulmonary vascular redistribution is usually due to cardiac failure but it may also occur in emphysema of lower lobes in which vascular flow is redirected to the functioning upper lobes.

Click here to see more images

Unenhanced axial CT confirm the relative sparing of upper lobes (D) and the severe emphysematous changes of lower lobes (E).

Coronal CT (F) shows severe emphysema of lower lobes and increased vascularity of upper lobes as well as discrete bronchial dilatations. Sagittal reconstruction demonstrates that the apparent wall of a bulla seen in the lateral chest radiograph represents the minor and major fissures (G, arrows) limiting a markedly emphysematous right middle lobe.

Diagnosis: Pulmonary emphysema secondary to alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency.

This condition affects young persons and causes severe emphysema of lower lobes and bronchial dilatations.

I am showing this case because is a good example of satisfaction of search (missing changes of the left lower lobe will lead you to the wrong diagnosis).
It is also a nice example of vascular redistribution secondary to pulmonary disease.

Cáceres Corner Case 228 – Vignette

Dear Friends,

Today I am showing a preoperative chest radiograph for varices of a 60-year-old woman.
Do you see any abnormality?
If so, where is it?

1. Lung
2. Mediastinum
3. Pleura/chest wall
4. Don’t see it

Click here to see the answer

Findings: There are bilateral convex opacities in the lower mediastinum (A, arrows), better seen in the cone down view (B, arrows). The appearance suggests a lower central mediastinal mass and the most likely diagnosis should be hiatus hernia. A fact against this diagnosis is the gastric fornix in its normal location (A, red arrow).

What would you recommend:

1. Lateral view of the chest
2. Esophagogram
3. Chest CT
4. None of the above

Click here to see the answer

In my opinion, the best choice is a lateral view, which shows poor definition of the body of the eleventh dorsal vertebra with a sharp angulation of the spine (C, circle). There is no evidence of hiatus hernia.

Click here to see the more images

AP cone down view of the lower thoracic spine shows a butterfly deformity of D11 (D, circle) with the outer borders accounting for the convexities visible in the chest radiograph. Lateral cone down view confirms marked flattening and collapse of the vertebral body (E, circle)

The patient had been involved in a car accident five years ago resulting in a burst compression fracture of D11. Comparison with previous radiographs did nor show any change.

Final diagnosis: Traumatic compression fracture of D11, stable

Teaching point: Remember that not all opacities in the lower mediastinum in the PA view are hiatus hernias. A lateral view places them in the correct compartment and helps to clarify the etiology.

Cáceres’ Corner Case 226 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today’s radiographs belong to a 27-year-old woman who came for a routine check-up.

Most likely diagnosis:

1. Thymic tumor
2. Enlarged lymph nodes
3. Aortic arch malformation
4. None of the above

CT images will be shown next Wednesday.

Click here to see the first images

Dear Friends,

Today I am showing enhanced CT images of the mediastinum in the early (A-B) and late phases (C-E).
What do you think?

Click here to see more images

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows a right upper mediastinal mass with undulated border (A, arrow). There is increased opacity of the anterior clear space in the lateral view (B, circle). In my opinion, the most likely diagnosis would be thymic tumor, although the undulated border favors enlarged lymph nodes.

Enhanced axial CTs in the arterial phase show an anterior mediastinal mass with minimal enhancement (C-D, arrows) and a vascular space in the center (C, yellow arrow).

Coronal and axial CTs in the late phase show partial washout of the vascular space (E, yellow arrow). The clue to the diagnosis lies in the presence of several punctate calcifications within the mass (F-G, red arrows) consistent with phleboliths, which are practically diagnostic of hemangioma. The central vascular space also supports the diagnosis.

The patient had been diagnosed of mediastinal hemangioma two years earlier and comparison with previous chest films and CTs did not show any change.
 
Final diagnosis: Mediastinal hemangioma
 
Congratulations to Naegleria and MK who gave similar diagnosis both at exactly 12:55 P.M.
 
Teaching point: This case is unusual (I have seen only two of them in the mediastinum) but can be easily diagnosed if phleboliths are present (and recognized). Early in my residency I learned that, when finding phleboliths within a mass, the diagnosis should be hemangioma until proven otherwise.
 
Ref. HP McAdams, ML Rosado de Christenson, CA Moran. Mediastinal hemangioma: radiographic and CT features in 14 patients. Radiology 1994; 193:399-402

Cáceres’ Corner Case 225 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today’s radiographs belong to a 37-year-old man with moderate fever.
What do you think?

Come back on Friday to see the answer!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: Chest radiographs show an intrapulmonary rounded opacity with ill-defined borders in the left lung (A-B, arrows). In a patient with fever and no other significant symptoms, the most likely diagnosis should be rounded pneumonia, although I was somewhat concerned about the good definition of the lower contour in the lateral view (B, red arrows), which is unusual in pneumonia.

The patient improved with treatment and follow-up radiographs four weeks later show only minimal residual findings in the PA view (C, arrow).

Final diagnosis: rounded pneumonia simulating a pulmonary mass.

Congratulations to Ahmad, who was the first to give the correct diagnosis. Silver medal to Sara Mercado/span>, who arrived second three hours later.

Teaching point: remember that not all pulmonary nodules/masses are malignant. If you want to know more about them, look up Diploma #51 “Innocuous pulmonary nodules”

Cáceres’ Corner Case 223 – SOLVED

Today’s radiographs belong to a 77-year-old man with dyspnea.

Diagnosis:

1.  Allergic aspergillosis
2.  A-V malformations
3.  Chronic changes post-TB
4.  None of the above

What do you see? Come back on Friday to see the answer 🙂

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiographs shows elongated opacities apparently arising from the hila (A, arrows). The lack of branching goes against mucous impactions. The clue to the diagnosis lies in the calcified pleural plaque in the right hemidiaphragm (A, red arrow), which is a sign that strongly suggests asbestos exposure.
This diagnosis is corroborated by the lateral view, which shows calcified pleural plaques in the anterior clear space (B, red arrow).

Previous AP and oblique rib radiographs after chest trauma show the undulated calcified plaque in the right hemithorax (C-D, arrows).

Unenhanced coronal CT confirms the plaque in the right hemidiaphragm (E, arrow). Axial CTs demonstrate the anterior plaques (F-G, red arrows), as well as the unaffected lung (F).

Final diagnosis: calcified pleural plaques simulating pulmonary disease.
 
Congratulations to Phi Pham, who was the first to make the correct diagnosis.
 
Teaching point: Remember that superimposed opacities may simulate intrapulmonary pathology.

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook 154 – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Eighth Session – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Showing today the leading case of webinar eight. Radiographs belong to 27-year-old with seminoma and pain in the anterior chest wall. What is your opinion about the  clavicular lesion?

1. Metastasis
2. Osteomyelitis
3. Benign bone lesion
4. Any of the above

Check out the last webinar form the series explaining in detail this case on our youtube channel and and catch up on previous ones on the EBR YouTube channel!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: the chest radiograph shows a lytic lesion in the proximal right clavicle (A-B, circles). It has a sclerotic border (A-B, red arrows), indicating a slow-growing process. This finding excludes options 1 and 2 and leaves option 3. Benign bone lesion as the correct diagnosis.

This lytic lesion correspond to a normal variant, called the rhomboid fossa. It represents the insertion site of the costoclavicular ligament( yellow), which extends from first rib (red) to the proximal clavicle (blue).
Is a normal variant and should not to be mistaken for an osteolytic lesion.

It occurs in 30% of males and 5% of females. It is more common in the young and becomes less visible with age.

Final diagnosis: rhomboid fossa of right clavicle

Congratulations to Faelivrin, who made the correct diagnosis

Teaching point: it is important to know the most common normal variants of the chest, to avoid confusing them with pathology.

Cáceres’ Corner Case 221 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today´s images belong to a 76-year-old man with pain in the back. Antecedents of urothelial carcinoma.

PA chest radiograph was normal and radiographs of the dorsal spine were taken.

What do you see?

Come back on Friday to see the solution!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: AP view of dorsal spine shows fixation screws in the lower spine and partial vertebroplasty of D12. The most important finding is that the left pedicle of D8 is absent (A, circle). In the lateral view, the posterior wall of the same vertebra is not seen (B, circle).

The findings are more evident in the cone down views (C-D, circles). In this particular case I was lucky because the superimposed air of the left main bronchus allows an unimpeded view of the missing pedicle.

Review of a recent chest CT demonstrated a lytic lesion in the body and pedicle of D8 (E-G, circles) that were no reported.

Final diagnosis: metastasis to D8 discovered in the plain film of the spine and overlooked in a previous CT.
 
Congratulations to BujarB, who was the only one to discover the missing pedicle (my hero!)
 
You may think that this case is difficult (only one of seven found the lesion). In the old times our routine included looking at the pedicles in the AP view of dorsal and lumbar spine. To familiarize you with the appearance of the normal spine, an AP view is shown below.

Teaching point: remember to look at the pedicles in the AP view. A missing pedicle in a patient with a known primary tumor is highly suspicious of metastasis.