Cáceres’ Corner Case 217 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

I am showing today PA chest radiographs in two asymptomatic patients They have subtle findings that can be discovered if you paid attention to the previous webinars.

What do you see?

Prof. Cáceres will take some well-deserved holidays and will come back on January 6th with new cases!

Click here to see the answer

Case 1 findings: PA radiograph shows a well-defined opacity behind the cardiac shadow (A, arrow), better seen in the cone-down view (B, arrow). It has an extrapulmonary appearance and the best option is diaphragmatic hernia.

Coronal and sagittal CT demonstrate herniated abdominal fat through a rent in the posterior diaphragm (C-D, arrows).
 
Final diagnosis:Bochdaleck hernia

Case 1 has been diagnosed by most of you. Congratulations to Archanareddyt,
who was the first. Hope my recommendations in Webinar 4 were helpful!


REMEMBER

In the cardiac area look for:

* Opacities behind the left heart
* Double contour on the right

Case 2 findings: This patient has a faint but visible right infraclavicular nodule (A-B, arrows).

The nodule was overlooked and one year later had grown markedly (D, arrow). At surgery, a melanoma was found.
 
Final diagnosis: melanoma of the lung, missed in the initial examination

Teaching point: This is a difficult case, but easily diagnosed if you remember my oft-repeated mantra: “Search for pulmonary nodules in the pulmonary apices” (Webinar 1). Nobody saw the nodule and I feel useless (sniff).

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook 151 – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Fifth Session – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Showing today the leading case of the next webinar. PA radiograph belongs to an 86-year-old woman with chest pain.
What do you see?

More images will be shown on Wednesday. You can refresh your memory viewing the older webinars on our youtube channel.

Dear Friends, showing today a lateral film of the case. Hope it helps.

Click here to see the lateral film

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiograph shows a faint opacity in the left mid-lung field (A, arrow), better seen in the cone down view (B, arrow). The opacity is ill-defined, and my first impression would be an intrapulmonary lesion.

The lateral view shows that the opacity is located in the posterior chest wall. It has a typical pregnancy sign (C, arrow), indicating an extrapulmonary origin.
Enhanced axial CT confirms a low-density chest wall mass (D, arrow). Note the anterior displacement of the intercostal vessel (D, red arrow).

Final diagnosis: lymphoma of chest wall
 
Congratulations to all of you who diagnosed a chest wall lesion. Special mention to MK, who was the first to give the answer.
 
Teaching point: This case documents the importance of the lateral chest to clarify indeterminate findings in the PA radiograph.

Check the full webinar here

Cáceres’ Corner Case 216 – SOLVED!

Dear Friends,

Today I am showing another case provided by my friend Dr. López Moreno. Radiographs belong to a 25-year-old woman with fainting spells. 

What do you see?

More images will be shown on Wednesday.

Dear Friends,

Showing coronal and sagittal images of enhanced CT.
What do you see?

Click here to see more images

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiograph shows convexity of the aorto-pulmonary window (A, arrow) which is encroaching upon the left hilum. Aside from a discrete pectus excavatum, I don’t see any significant findings in the lateral view (B).

According to Diploma 144, the main causes of a prominent A-P window are either enlarged lymph nodes or an arterial aneurysm and a CT should be obtained. In this particular patient coronal enhanced CT shows an aortic aneurysm projecting over the A-P window (C, arrow) and located anterior to the aortic arch in the sagittal projection (D, arrow).

The appearance is compatible with traumatic pseudoaneurysm, but the patient did not have any antecedent of traumatism. In our opinion (Dr López Moreno and mine) we believe that it represents a ductus aneurysm because of the location and the thin band joining the aneurysm and the pulmonary artery (E, circle). The pinpoint calcification in the middle of the band may be calcium in the ductus ligament or be secondary to partial-volume effect.

An unexpected finding is the compression of the left main bronchus by the aneurysm (E-F, arrows). It would have been interesting to perform expiration films to detect air-trapping of the left lung.

Some of you have mentioned Kommerel diverticulum. This malformation is located posteriorly and occurs in aberrant subclavian artery, which courses behind the trachea and pushes it forward in the lateral chest radiograph. You can see examples in case 213 of Caceres’ corner and Diploma cases 2, 9 and 84.
 
Final diagnosis: Probable aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus
 
Congratulations to S who was the first to think of the ductus in the plain film and made the diagnosis of ductus diverticulum after CT.
 
Teaching point: this is my first ductus aneurysm (if we are right) and I cannot have much to say. Perhaps to stress again the importance of looking at the aorto-pulmonary window in the PA radiograph.

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook 150 – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Fourth Session

Dear Friends,

Presenting today the leading case of the next webinar. PA radiograph of a 58-year-old woman with cough and fever.

What do you see?

The answer will be published on Friday. While you wait, you can check the first three webinars, check the EBR youtube channel!

Click here to see the image

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows an ill-defined opacity behind the right hemidiaphragm (A, red arrows), better seen in the cone-down view (B, red arrows). The fact that the opacity is visible indicates that it is surrounded by air, placing it in the right lower lobe.

A lateral view confirms air-space disease in the RLL (C, circle), blurring the posterior aspect of the right hemidiaphragm.

Final diagnosis: RLL pneumonia
 
Congratulations to archanareddyt who was the first to see the opacity and to MK who saw it and suggested the right diagnosis.
 
Teaching point: Remember that in the PA view the lower lobes go deep behind the diaphragm. Pulmonary disease of any kind can be seen in the upper quadrants of the abdomen, as demonstrated by the present case.

Remember to check the webinar published on the EBR youtube channel!

Cáceres’ Corner Case 215 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today’s case has been provided by my good friend and former resident Victor Pineda. Radiographs belong to a 56-year-old man with cough and fever.
What do you see?

More images will be shown on Wednesday!

Click here to see the images shown on Monday

Dear friends hope these new images help you with the diagnosis.

Click here to see more images

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows a large paramediastinal lung opacity (A, arrow) that at first glance suggest malignancy. The clue to the diagnosis lies in identifying multiple bronchiectasis in the right and left central lung fields (A, circles).

The lateral view confirms the opacity in the posterior segment of the RUL (B, arrow) and bronchiectasis in the anterior clear space (B, circle).

Central bronchiectasis accompanied by lung opacities are typical of diseases with thick tenacious mucus and are the hallmark of cystic fibrosis o allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Coronal and axial CT confirm the presence of numerous central bronchiectasis, one of them with a large mucous impaction (C and D, arrows).

In the mediastinal window the impacted mucus is increased in density (E and F, arrows), which is a pathognomonic sign of ABPA.

Final diagnosis: ABPA with central bronchiectasis and dense pulmonary impaction
 
Congratulations to MG who was the first to answer and made a valiant effort to diagnose a difficult case.
 
Teaching point: this case looks difficult, but the diagnosis is easy if we identify basic findings. Discovering central bronchiectasis narrows the diagnosis to two entities and CT confirms one of them.

Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook 149 – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – Third Session – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

I am showing today the leading image of the third webinar. If you haven’t seen them, you can see the first one here and the second one here:

Chest radiograph belongs to a 24-year-old man with occasional episodes of fainting, currently asymptomatic.

What do you see?

Come back on Friday and enjoy the recording of the third webinar with the answer to this case and more information!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows convexity of the right outline of the middle mediastinum (A, arrow), suggesting dilatation of the ascending aorta. Some of you have mentioned aortic coarctation, which is not a good option because rib notching is not visible, and the aortic knob is unremarkable.
Given the patient´s age, a good possibility is congenital aortic stenosis.

Enhanced sagittal CT reconstruction shows dilatation of the ascending aorta (B, asterisk) and heavy calcification of the aortic valve (B, arrow). Axial CT demonstrated a malformed and calcified aortic valve (C, circle).

Final diagnosis: congenital aortic valve stenosis with post-stenotic dilatation

Congratulations to Renga, who was the first to mention the ascending aorta dilatation.
 
Teaching point: the middle third of the mediastinum is occupied by the aorta and pulmonary artery. Any mediastinal abnormality in this area should be suspected to have a vascular origin.

You can see on our youtube channel the webinar Prof. Cáceres has prepared discussing this case and others.

Cáceres’ Corner Case 214 – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Presenting today radiographs of an 89-year-old woman with dyspnea and moderate fever.

Diagnosis:

1. Empyema
2. Mediastinal tumor
3. Pneumonia
4. None of the above

What do you see? Come back on Friday to see the answer!

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA chest radiograph shows an opacity occupying the middle and lower right lung It is located anteriorly in the lateral view and has a well-defined posterior border.
The clue to the diagnosis lies with the bubbles of air within the opacity (A, red arrows) which resemble bowel loops in the lateral view (B, circle). The heart is displaced towards the left, but this finding cannot be evaluated because of the moderate scoliosis. In addition, a hiatus hernia is present (A-B, arrows).

Enhanced axial CT (C-D) demonstrates that the opacity consists mainly of fat containing some bowel loops.

Coronal and sagittal reconstructions show a large gap in the anterior right hemidiaphragm (E-F, circles), with herniation of bowel and abdominal fat into the hemithorax.

Final diagnosis: large Morgagni´s hernia simulating pulmonary disease.
 
Congratulations to xristoby, who was the only one who mentioned anterior diaphragmatic hernia.
 
Teaching point: Remember that any lower lung lesion adjacent to the diaphragm may arise from the abdomen, as demonstrated with the present case.