Dr. Pepe’s Diploma Casebook – All you need to know to interpret a chest radiograph – First Session – CASE 147 – SOLVED

There are some things which cannot be learned quickly, and time, which is all we have, must be paid heavily for their acquiring. They are the simplest things; and, because it takes a man’s life to know them, the little new that each man gets from life is very costly and the only heritage he has to leave

Dear friends, this quote from Ernest Hemingway serves as introduction to the next series of webinars. From October to March I intend to give a webinar every two weeks describing my basic approach to interpreting the chest radiograph. The subject is ample, and will continue with a second series in 2021.

To start, I am showing a preoperative PA chest radiograph for varices in a 60-year-old woman. The chest was read as normal, but there is an abnormality, difficult to detect.
Do you see it?

The answer was given during a webinar. You can watch the webinar here

Click here to see the answer

Findings: PA radiograph shows a small nodule overlapping the left cardiac border (A-B, arrows). The nodule was overlooked, and the chest was read as normal.

A chest radiograph taken four years later shows a marked increase in size of the nodule (C, arrow). Enhanced axial CT shows a non-enhancing low-density nodule (-30 H.U.)
(D, arrow). Needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hamartoma.

Final diagnosis: Pulmonary hamartoma, overlooked in the initial film
 
Congratulations to Uve, who discovered the nodule with a little help.
 
Teaching point: Remember that overlooking visible findings accounts for 50% of our errors. Using checklists is an excellent way to change an error into a discovery.

Dr. Pepe Case 139 – Webinar

Dear Friends,

Presenting PA chest radiograph of a 57-year-old woman with dyspnea and  fever.

What would be your diagnosis?
1. Lobar collapse
2. Pneumonia
3. Unilateral pulmonary edema
4. Any of the above

You have one week to post your answers. The correct answer will be given during the webinar of Wednesday 3 at 12:30 P.M.
You can join the webinar here

Click here to see the image

New Webinar Prof. Cáceres! Tuesday 18 December – SOLVED

Dear Friends,

Today I am presenting chest radiographs of a 66-year-old man with cough and low-grade fever.
What would be your diagnosis?

1. Pleural effusion
2. Lobar collapse
3. Pneumonia
4. Any of the above

You have one week to post your answers. The correct answer will be given during the webinar of Tuesday 18 at 12:30 P.M.
You can join the webinar here

Continue reading “New Webinar Prof. Cáceres! Tuesday 18 December – SOLVED”

Dr. Pepe’s dedicated picture

Dear Friends,

It has been one week since we published the webinar and we would like to send you the pictures we promised. However, we made a big mistake: we didn’t provide for your adding your name and e-mail address to the answers, so I can’t know who’s right and who isn’t.

Since this is our fault, I will honor my word: once you have seen the webinar, you decide if you got three or more correct answers. If so, write a comment on this entry with your name and e-mail address and a dedicated picture of Dr. Pepe will be mailed to you.

Sorry about the inconvenience. I trust your honesty. Scout’s honor.

Dr. Pepe is preparing a new webinar!

Dear Friends,

I’m preparing a cycle of six webinars about basic interpretation of chest radiographs. The first one will be about the PA view, and today I’m presenting six cases that will be shown during this webinar.

You can respond in the blog, as usual. Answers will be given on Monday, November fifth, when the webinar will be posted on the Diploma web.

To encourage your participation, any of you who get three or more right answers will receive a dedicated picture of Dr. Pepe in their mail. Leave your answers in the comments if you want to receive the picture!

Good luck!

Continue reading “Dr. Pepe is preparing a new webinar!”